Drug shortages mobile app launched by FDA

March 4, 2015

FDA has launched its first mobile application (app) designed to provide quick access to important information on medications that are in short supply. Current or resolved drug shortages, as well as product discontinuations, can be identified by using the new app.

FDA has launched its first mobile application (app) designed to provide quick access to important information on medications that are in short supply. Current or resolved drug shortages, as well as product discontinuations, can be identified by using the new app.

The app is part of FDA’s effort discussed in its “Strategic Plan for Preventing and Mitigating Drug Shortages” to improve access to drug shortage information. Users of the app will be able to browse or search by the generic name or active ingredient of a drug. They can also seek information through a given therapeutic category. Further, healthcare providers can report a supply issue or potential drug shortage directly to FDA through the app.

Drug shortages can negatively impact patients by delaying or not allowing the care that they need. Because of such shortages, healthcare providers can find themselves looking to other drugs as substitutes. These other drugs may carry higher risks or simply be less effective in treating a patient’s condition.

Related:Drug shortages have big impact on patient care

The new app, by giving providers a means through which they can receive timely information on drug shortages, aids their ability to make the best possible decisions about a patient’s treatment. As Valerie Jensen, the associate director of the Drug Shortage Staff at FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, comments: “The new mobile app is an innovative tool that will offer easier and faster access to important drug shortage information.”

Those interested in downloading the app can do so for free by searching “FDA Drug Shortages” through the Google Play store (Android devices) or iTunes (Apple devices).

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