Enhanced pharmacist care improves LDL in patients with dyslipidemia

March 30, 2012

Enhanced pharmacist care for patients with dyslipidemia improves low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, according to a study published in the March issue of Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy.

Enhanced pharmacist care for patients with dyslipidemia improves low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels, according to a study published in the March issue of Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy.

The study, led by Theresa L. Charrois, BScPharm, MSc, included the systematic review of 21 randomized, controlled trials.

The primary outcome measure assessed was the difference, at the end of the follow-up, in LDL cholesterol levels between the groups of dyslipidemia patients who had pharmacist intervention and those who had standard care.

The researchers also looked at the difference between the groups in total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels.

At the end of follow-up, the mean LDL level was 10.7 mg/dL lower in the enhanced pharmacy care groups compared to the standard care groups. In addition, the mean cholesterol level was significantly lower in the enhanced pharmacy care groups compared with the standard care groups.

Patients who received enhanced pharmacist care were also more likely than those receiving standard care to achieve target lipid parameters and to have a lipid panel ordered or recommended by a pharmacist during the study.

“Patients in the pharmacist intervention groups were almost twice as likely as patients in the standard care groups to have a change in lipid-lowering therapies. These results point to the benefit that pharmacist care can provide across the spectrum of dyslipidemia management,” the researchers stated.