MTX injection not superior to oral administration in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

June 22, 2012
Formulary staff
Formulary staff

Injections of methotrexate were not superior to oral therapy in long-term treatment of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, according to a new study, published in the May 30 online edition of Arthritis Care & Research.

Injections of methotrexate were not superior to oral therapy in long-term treatment of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), according to a new study, published in the May 30 online edition of Arthritis Care & Research.

In the retrospective study, led by Araine Klein with Asklepios Klinik Sankt Augustin, in Germany, researchers reviewed 411 patients with JIA who received methotrexate (MTX) for at least 6 months. Patients in both the oral therapy and subcutaneous groups showed a high clinical response (73% for oral vs 72% for injection). In addition, 22% of patients who received oral MTX had at least 1 adverse event, compared to 27% in the subcutaneous group.

However, significantly more patients with subcutaneous application discontinued MTX because of adverse events (11%) compared to oral (5%).

“In this retrospective analysis, parenteral MTX was not superior to oral administration, regarding efficacy and tolerability,” the researchers wrote.