Patients with type 2 diabetes and a history of cardiovascular events have high rates of additional cardiovascular events

August 9, 2013

It is well known that type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. A recent epidemiologic study conducted in the United Kingdom assessed the time to first major cardiovascular event in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a large real-world population.

It is well known that type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. A recent epidemiologic study conducted in the United Kingdom assessed the time to first major cardiovascular event in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a large real-world population.

This data was presented in June at the American Diabetes Association 73rd Scientific Sessions, in Chicago.

The researchers conducted retrospective analyses using an anonymous, longitudinal, primary care database linked to secondary care and mortality data. Criteria for inclusion included being at least 40 years of age, having HbA1C of at least 6.5%, and having either established cardiovascular disease and/or presence of multiple cardiovascular risk factors.

Researchers identified 21,560 eligible patients. More than half (57%) were men, and patients’ mean age was 70.1 years. The probability of suffering a fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction or stroke by 1, 3, 5, and 6 years post-index was 4.4%, 9.4%, 13.4%, and 15.3%, respectively.

There were 10,154 patients who had suffered prior cardiovascular events, and their probability of experiencing a subsequent cardiovascular event by 1, 3, 5, and 6 years post-index was 7.2%, 14.6%, 19.9%, and 22.3%, respectively. Additionally, there were 11,406 patients who had multiple risk factors but who had not experienced a prior cardiovascular event. Their probability of experiencing a cardiovascular event by 1, 3, 5, and 6 years was 1.9%, 4.7%, 7.7%, and 9.0%, respectively.

This study showed that patients with a history of cardiovascular events as well as those with multiple risk factors had high rates of cardiovascular events. However, patients with a history of prior cardiovascular events had a higher probability of experiencing future cardiovascular events than those with risk factors.