Rivaroxaban associated with lower inpatient costs compared to warfarin among NVAF patients

August 12, 2014

Hospitalization costs for rivaroxaban (Xarelto, Janssen) were significantly lower than warfarin in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), according to a study in the August 2014 issue of Current Medical Research & Opinion.

Raut

Hospitalization costs for rivaroxaban (

, Janssen) were significantly lower than warfarin in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), according to a study in the August 2014 issue of Current Medical Research & Opinion.

Hospitals, drug costs and technology will increase healthcare costs in 2015

According to the study, rivaroxaban was associated with cost savings of $1,284 per patient compared to warfarin.

The retrospective claims analysis of adult patients hospitalized for NVAF was conducted using the Premier Perspective Comparative Hospital Database from November 2010 to September 2012. Patients using rivaroxaban were matched with up to 4 warfarin users by propensity score analyses and hospitalization costs were compared between the 2 cohorts. A sub-analysis was performed for patients who were first administered their treatment on day 3 or later of their hospital stay.

The matched cohorts’ (2,809 rivaroxaban and 11,085 warfarin users) characteristics were well balanced. Mean age of cohorts was 71 years and 49% of patients were female. The average hospitalization cost of rivaroxaban users was $11,993 compared to $13,255 for warfarin users. The cost difference was significantly lower by $1,284 (P<.001). Patients who were administered rivaroxaban treatment on day 3 or after incurred significantly lower hospitalization costs (cost difference: $4,350; P<.001) compared to warfarin users. Rivaroxaban users with a primary diagnosis of atrial fibrillation also had significantly lower costs compared to warfarin users.

“The findings demonstrate the potential for cost-savings with [rivaroxaban] in the hospital setting as payers, providers and patients alike struggle to manage the rising costs of inpatient care,” said study investigator Monika Raut, PhD, MS, associate director, Health Economics and Outcomes Research (HECOR), Cardiovascular. 

According to the most recent available data from the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare services, hospital expenditures grew 4.9% to $882.3 billion in 2012, a marked increase from 3.5% growth in 2011.

“These findings underscore that [rivaroxaban] may substantially reduce the cost of a hospital stay,” Raut said. “[Rivaroxaban] offers significant cost-savings over standard of care among patients hospitalized with NVAF, without the need for the routine blood monitoring or dose adjustments.”