Rx errors in HIV patients can be reduced by pharmacists

May 14, 2014

A pharmacist who is proficient at monitoring and ensuring appropriate therapy, as well as providing necessary medication counseling, will greatly enhance compliance and reduce potential adverse drug reactions and interactions in HIV-positive hospital patients, according to FormularyWatch advisor James M. Wooten, PharmD, associate professor, department of medicine, section of clinical pharmacology, University of Missouri-Kansas City.

A pharmacist who is proficient at monitoring and ensuring appropriate therapy, as well as providing necessary medication counseling, will greatly enhance compliance and reduce potential adverse drug reactions and interactions in HIV-positive hospital patients, according to FormularyWatch advisor James M. Wooten, PharmD, associate professor, department of medicine, section of clinical pharmacology, University of Missouri-Kansas City. 

A study published in Annals of Pharmacotherapy and reported by Drug Topics, summarized literature regarding antiretroviral and other medication errors to find solutions. It found that a pharmacist’s participation on medical teams treating HIV-positive hospital patients reduces medication errors as well as spots and corrects them sooner.

Canadian researchers analyzed 25 studies involving medication errors and HIV-positive hospitalized patients. All of the studies were published between 2000 and 2013 and each involved between 26 and 290 patients.

“Because HIV is now a manageable disease, patients who are HIV positive require care by individuals who understand the disease, its treatment, and all the implications that complicated pharmacotherapy regimen can include,” said Dr Wooten. 

“The pharmacotherapy for HIV itself as well as for the other infections and symptoms associated with the disease has changed dramatically over the years,” Dr Wooten said. “New antiviral drugs continue to be developed and new antiviral regimens and combinations change continuously. This is necessary in order to combat resistance.”

For more on this topic:

CDC releases guidelines for HIV preventive meds