Study finds that dapagliflozin produces similar glycemic efficacy to glipizide

August 9, 2013

When metformin cannot maintain glycemic control, sulfonylureas are often used as add-on therapy in type 2 diabetes; however, risks include weight gain and hypoglycemia. Dapagliflozin is an SGLT2 inhibitor and increases urinary glucose excretion and reduces hyperglycemia independently of insulin secretion or action.

When metformin cannot maintain glycemic control, sulfonylureas are often used as add-on therapy in type 2 diabetes; however, risks include weight gain and hypoglycemia, according to research presented in June at the American Diabetes Association 73rd Scientific Sessions, in Chicago. Dapagliflozin is an SGLT2 inhibitor and increases urinary glucose excretion and reduces hyperglycemia independently of insulin secretion or action.

A recent international, 52-week, double-blind, active-controlled, non-inferiority trial randomized patients who were inadequately controlled on metformin: 406 patients were given add-on dapagliflozin ≤10mg/d and 408 patients were given glipizide ≤20 mg/d. Patients were maintained to Week 52 unless hypoglycemia warranted down-titration.

At Week 52, 3 times more patients treated with dapagliflozin achieved combined HbA1C and weight reduction (66.9%) compared with patients taking glipizide (21.3%). Most patients taking dapagliflozin (74.7%) and glipizide (73.8%) achieved an HbA1C reduction, while 83.5% of patients taking dapagliflozin also experience weight reduction compared with only 26.8% of patients taking glipizide. Additionally, only 3.5% of patients taking dapagliflozin experienced hypoglycemic events, compared with 40.8% of patients taking glipizide.